SOLUTION: ECON 4F03 McMaster University Elections and Economic Growth Summary

McMaster University, Department of Economics, ECON 4F03 C01 AND C02
ECON 4F03: Methods of Inquiry in Economics
Fall 2020
Instructor: Paul Contoyannis
Email: contoyp@mcmaster.ca
Virtual (Zoom) Office Hours: 3 – 4.30pm Tuesday and Thursday
CONTENTS
Course Description …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 2
Prerequisites ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 2
Course Objectives………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 2
Course Materials and Texts …………………………………………………………………………………………. 3
Avenue to Learn…………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3
Course Evaluation………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3
Grading STANDARDS ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3
Proposal, summary, and final paper: ………………………………………………………………………….. 3
Team presentations: ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3
Course Policies ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4
Grades ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4
Submission of Assignments, Reports and Final Paper ………………………………………………….. 4
Late Submissions ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4
Absences, Missed Work, Illness (MSAF) …………………………………………………………………….. 4
Where to Get Help ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4
Turnitin.com …………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5
Weekly Course Schedule and important dates ………………………………………………………………… 6
Tentative presentations scheduLE ………………………………………………………………………………… 7
expectations for team Presentations ……………………………………………………………………………… 8
University Policies ………………………………………………………………………………………………………10
Page 1 of 12
McMaster University, Department of Economics, ECON 4F03 C01 AND C02
COURSE DESCRIPTION
Research is the systematic investigation of a specific question or problem. This course will help
the student to develop research skills, to analyze critically the research of others, and to
improve their writing and presentation skills. In this course, we will consider a variety of
approaches to empirical economic research. Observational studies use data routinely collected
by organizations such as Statistics Canada. Laboratory experiments evaluate economic
problems in an artificial setting (usually a series of linked computer stations) created by the
analyst. Social and field experiments attempt to mimic laboratory conditions in a real world
setting, while in a natural experiment the analyst exploits changes in the real world, often in
government policy, to uncover causal relationships using observational data. A series of
lectures and discussions will develop the student’s knowledge of experimental and
observational methodologies. The ability to describe and assess such methodologies will be
examined in a critical review paper which will focus on 3 empirical articles.
PREREQUISITES
Prerequisite(s): ECON 2G03 or 2X03; and 2H03; Credit or registration in ECON 3E03 (or
3WW3) or ECON 3EE3 (or 3U03), registration in Level III or Level IV of an Honours Economics
program
COURSE OBJECTIVES
At the end of this course students will:





Know how to search for and evaluate research papers and journal articles.
Be able to interpret descriptive statistics and regression models.
Understand the following approaches to empirical economic research:
o Observational studies
o Laboratory experiments
o Social experiments
o Field experiments
o Natural experiments
Have gained experience at presenting and evaluating the research work of others, both
orally and in writing.
Have gained experience working in teams.
COMMUNICATION
The primary way for me to communicate with you in an online course is via the Announcements
section of the Avenue homepage. It is your responsibility to check the Announcements on
Avenue daily. If you click your name in the top right corner of the Avenue page and choose
“Notifications”, you will see a list of items that you can receive notifications for. Choose
“Announcements” – any time there is a new or updated announcement, you will receive an
email or SMS on your phone.”
Page 2 of 12
McMaster University, Department of Economics, ECON 4F03 C01 AND C02
COURSE MATERIALS AND TEXTS
The following is a recommended resource as it accessibly covers many of the methods
discussed in the articles we will review and that you will find when doing your critical review (but
it is not required):
Bailey, Michael (2019) ‘Real Econometrics’ 2nd edition. Oxford University Press.
AVENUE TO LEARN
Avenue to Learn is McMaster’s Learning Management System. I will be using Avenue to Learn
(A2L) to post course announcements, all required readings, powerpoint slides and pre-recorded
lectures, other files that you can download, and your grades. You will also use Avenue to Learn
for uploading your assignments, your paper proposal, paper summary and final paper, and your
team presentations.
Students should be aware that, when they access the electronic components of this course,
private information such as first and last names, user names for the McMaster e-mail accounts,
and program affiliation may become apparent to all other students in the same course. The
available information is dependent on the technology used. Continuation in this course will be
deemed consent to this disclosure. If you have any questions or concerns about such disclosure
please discuss this with the course instructor.
COURSE EVALUATION
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Assignment 1 7.5%
Assignment 2 7.5 %
Proposal for critical review paper(1-2 pages) – 5%
Summary of critical review paper (4 pages) – 10%
Final paper-critical review paper (10 pages) – 30%
Team presentation of assigned research paper – 20%
Topic Quizzes/Class participation – 20%
Evaluation will be based on a series of assignments and classroom participation. The written
assignments develop the students’ research skills and build towards the critical review of 3
scholarly articles. Presentations will be graded based on team performance. Deadlines for the
topic quizzes/class participation will be added as the course progresses.
GRADING STANDARDS
Proposal, summary, and final paper:
see separate handout
Team presentations:
see after the team presentation schedule at the end of this document
Page 3 of 12
McMaster University, Department of Economics, ECON 4F03 C01 AND C02
COURSE POLICIES
Grades
Grades will be based on the McMaster University grading scale:
MARK
GRADE
90-100
85-90
80-84
77-79
73-76
70-72
67-69
63-66
60-62
57-59
53-56
50-52
0-49
A+
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
CD+
D
DF
Submission of Assignments, Reports and Final Paper
All assignments, team presentations, and the review paper proposal, review paper summary
and final review paper must be uploaded to Avenue to Learn by the stated deadlines. Copies of
the paper summary and final paper should be submitted to turnitin.com (more details below).
Late Submissions
If you submit your work late you will be penalized. Late by 24 hours or less: 10% penalty. Work
submitted more than 24 hours late will normally not be graded and earn a grade of zero.
Absences, Missed Work, Illness (MSAF)
The only valid excuses for missed classes, presentations and late submissions are those
approved by your Faculty office. Instructors will only grant relief for missed work when a
McMaster Student Absence Form (MSAF) has been received. Upon reception of an MSAF,
submission deadlines will normally be extended.
Where to Get Help
My office hours are listed at the top of this document. You can also email me if you have a quick
question or to set up an individual appointment. If you need help with writing, McMaster
students now have free access to an on-line program to help with writing. This program is
called Grammarly. The user copies and pastes text into the program and receives notification of
errors and suggestions for corrections. To register as a user, go to
http://www.grammarly.com/edu/ and “Sign Up”.
Academic support services are also available from the Student Success Centre. Please see
Page 4 of 12
McMaster University, Department of Economics, ECON 4F03 C01 AND C02
https://studentsuccess.mcmaster.ca/academic-support/academicsupport/.
Turnitin.com
In this course, we will be using web based service Turnitin.com (http://turnitin.com/ ) to reveal
academic dishonesty in your summary and final paper. We will also be comparing papers
submitted in the three sections. To see the McMaster Turnitin.com Policy, please go to
http://www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity/turnitin/guidelines.html. Should you object to the
submission of your work to Turnitin.com you must still submit copies of your summary and final
paper.
Page 5 of 12
McMaster University, Department of Economics, ECON 4F03 C01 AND C02
WEEKLY COURSE SCHEDULE AND IMPORTANT DATES
Week ending
11 Sept.
18 Sept.
25 Sept
2 Oct
9 Oct.
16 Oct.
23 Oct.
30 Oct.
6 Nov.
13 Nov.
20 Nov.
27 Nov.
4 Dec.
11 Dec.
Deadline is Friday
6:00pm
Assignment #1
Paper proposal
Assignment#2
Paper Summary
Topics (required readings follow this table)
Introduction
Reasoning
Correlation vs Causation
Fundamentals of Econometrics
Laboratory Experiments
READING WEEK
Social and Field Experiments
Natural Experiments and Internal and External Validity
Critical Reading
Team Presentations
Team Presentations
Team Presentations
Team Presentations
Final Paper due
Dec. 11th at 6pm
Topic
Required Readings
Reasoning
“Statistics and Logic,” Chapter 1 from Lucy Horowitz and Lou Ferleger, Statistics
for Social Change. Black Rose Books, 1988.
Correlation vs.
Causation
“Controlled Experiments,” Chapter 1 and “Observational Studies,” Chapter 2 from
David Freedman, Robert Pisani, Roger Purves, Statistics. Norton, 4th Edition, 2007.
Pages 5–13 from James Stock and Mark Watson, An Introduction to Econometrics.
3rd Edition, 2011.
Fundamentals of
Econometrics
“An introduction to regression analysis,”Alan O.Sykes (Coase-Sandor Institute for
Law & Economics Working Paper No. 20, 1993).
“Linear Regression with Multiple Regressors,” Chapter 6, pages 179–204 from
James Stock and Mark Watson, An Introduction to Econometrics. 3rd Edition, 2011.
Laboratory
Experiments
“Laboratory Economics: Of Rats and Men,” Chapter 9 from T. Sandler, Economic
Concepts for the Social Sciences. Cambridge University Press, 2002.
“Why labor market experiments?” Falk, A. and Fehr, E. Labour Economics 10,
2003, 399–406.
Page 6 of 12
McMaster University, Department of Economics, ECON 4F03 C01 AND C02
Social and
Field Experiments
“The Case for Randomized Field Trials in Economic and Policy Research,” Gary
Burtless, Journal of Economic Perspectives, 1995, 9, 2.
Natural
Experiments
“Field experiments in economics: The past, the present, and the future” Steven
Levitt and John List. European Economic Review 53, 2009, 1–18.
“Natural and Quasi-Experiments in Economics,” Bruce Meyer, Journal of Business
and Economics Statistics 13(2), 1995, 151–161.
“Using natural experiments to evaluate population health interventions: new
Medical Research Council guidance” C. Cooper C et al., Journal of Epidemiology
and Community Health (2012).
Internal and
External validity
“Assessing studies based on Multiple Regression,” Chapter 9, pages 315–340 from
James Stock and Mark Watson, An Introduction to Econometrics. 3rd Edition, 2011.
“Internal and external validity in economics research: tradeoffs between
experiments, field experiments, natural experiments, and field data,” Brian Roe and
David Just, American Journal of Agricultural Economics 91(5), 2009, 1266–1271.
Critical Reading
“Critical Reading or How to Make Sense of Published Research,” Chapter 6 from
Steven Greenlaw, Doing Economics: A guide to understanding and carrying out
economic research. Houghton-Mifflin Company, 2006.
TENTATIVE PRESENTATIONS SCHEDULE
Topic 1: Health Insurance
13 Nov
13 Nov
13 Nov
“The Effect of De-listing Publicly Funded Health Care Services,” M. Stabile and C.
Ward, in Health Services Restructuring in Canada: New Evidence and New
Directions, John Deutsch Institute for the Study of Economic Policy, Beach. C.,
Chaykowski, R., Shortt, S., St-Hilaire, F. and Sweetman, A. (eds.), McGill/Queen’s
University Press, Kingston, 2006, 83–110.
“Willingness-to-Pay for Parallel Private Insurance: Canadian Evidence from a Laboratory Experiment,” N. Buckley, K. Cuff, J. Hurley, L. McLeod, R. Nuscheler and
D. Cameron, Canadian Journal of Economics 45(1), 2012, 137–166.
“The RAND Health Insurance Experiment, Three Decades Later.” A. Aron-Dine et.
al. Journal of Economic Perspectives 27(1), 2013, 197–222.
Topic 2: Labour Markets
20 Nov
“In and out of the labour market: long-term income consequences of child-related
interruptions to women’s paid work,” S. Phipps, P. Burton, and L. Lethbridge,
Page 7 of 12
McMaster University, Department of Economics, ECON 4F03 C01 AND C02
Canadian Journal of Economics 34(2), 2001, 411–429.
20 Nov
“The Impact of the Mariel Boatlift on the Miami Labor Market,” D. Card, Industrial
and Labor Relations Review 43, 1990, 245–257.
20 Nov
“The wage impact of the Marielitos: a reappraisal” George J. Borjas, Industrial
and Labor Relations Review 70(5), October 2017, pp. 1077–1110
Topic 3: Determinants of Health
27 Nov
“How does electronic cigarette access affect adolescent smoking?” A. Friedman,
Journal of Health Economics 44, 2015, 300–308.
27 Nov
‘Winning big but feeling no better? The effect of lottery prizes on physical and
mental health.’ Benedicte Apouey and Andrew E. Clark Health Economics. 24:
516–538 (2015)
27 Nov
“Income, Health, and Well-Being around the World: Evidence from the Gallup
World Poll”. Angus Deaton. Journal of Economic Perspectives Volume 22,
Number 2—Spring 2008—Pages 53–72
Topic 4: Determinants of Employment and Unemployment
4 Dec
“Minimum Wages and Employment: A Case Study of the Fast-food
Industry in New Jersey and Pennsylvania,” D. Card and A. Krueger,
American Economic Review 84(2), 1994, 772–793.
4 Dec
“The Effect of Minimum Wages on Low-Wage Jobs.” Doruk Cengiz and
Arindrajit Dube and Attila Lindner and Ben Zipperer Quarterly Journal Of
Economics (2019), 1405–1454
4 Dec
“Do Workers Work More if Wages Are High? Evidence from a
Randomized Field Experiment,” E. Fehr and L. Goette, American
Economic Review 97(1), 2007, 298–317.
4 Dec
‘The Effect of Mental Health on Employment: Evidence from Australian
Panel Data’ Paul Frijters, David W. Johnston, And Michael A. Shields.
Health Economics. 23: 1058–1071 (2014)
Note: The schedule will be finalized once course enrollment numbers are finalized
EXPECTATIONS FOR TEAM PRESENTATIONS
All class members are expected to have read each paper and to listen to/read the slides
uploaded to Avenue to Learn by each team. Expectations will be assessed using short quizzes.
The presentation should provide answers to the following questions:
Page 8 of 12
McMaster University, Department of Economics, ECON 4F03 C01 AND C02










With what economic question(s) is the paper concerned?
With what economic policy issues is the paper concerned?
What are two or three key findings from the literature that the paper cites?
What economic theory is drawn upon?
What type of data does the paper use to tests its hypotheses (observational, social
experiment, laboratory experiment, field experiment)?
What estimation methods do the authors use?
What key results do the authors report?
What are the policy implications of these findings?
What are the strengths and weaknesses of these analyses? (Clearly distinguish between
internal and external strengths and weaknesses.)
What should be on the agenda for future research in this area?
Guidelines for Team Presentations




Use PowerPoint presentations with: 3-4 bullets per slide of a few lines each.
You should be using around 15 slides.
construct figures and tables as appropriate to facilitate your presentation.(e.g. create a
summary table of results)
avoid a word for word reading of the slides.
Team Presentation Assessment
Your team grade will be based on accuracy and quality of economic content as well as the
effectiveness of both your slides and verbal presentation.
Team Formation:
There will be up to 13 teams, depending on class size. Individuals will be assigned to teams by
the alphabetical order of surnames on my class list on Friday, Sept 25th.
On Friday, Sept 25th teams will be randomly assigned a topic. These initial assignments will be
posted on Avenue to Learn. Teams will have until 6pm on Friday, Oct 9th to inform me of any
mutually agreeable trades with other teams concerning dates and topics. The final list will be
posted on Avenue to Learn on or shortly after Oct. 9th.
Page 9 of 12
McMaster University, Department of Economics, ECON 4F03 C01 AND C02
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process. Academic
credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity. It is your responsibility to
understand what constitutes academic dishonesty.
Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or
advantage. This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of
credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: “Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty”), and/or
suspension or expulsion from the university. For information on the various types of academic dishonesty please
refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, located at https://secretariat.mcmaster.ca/university-policies-proceduresguidelines/
The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:
• plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one’s own or for which other credit has been obtained.
• improper collaboration in group work.
• copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.
AUTHENTICITY / PLAGIARISM DETECTION
Some courses may use a web-based service (Turnitin.com) to reveal authenticity and ownership of student
submitted work. For courses using such software, students will be expected to submit their work electronically either
directly to Turnitin.com or via an online learning platform (e.g. A2L, etc.) using plagiarism detection (a service
supported by Turnitin.com) so it can be checked for academic dishonesty.
Students who do not wish their work to be submitted through the plagiarism detection software must inform the
Instructor before the assignment is …
Purchase answer to see full
attachment

Order a unique copy of this paper
(550 words)

Approximate price: $22

Our Basic features
  • Free title page and bibliography
  • Plagiarism-free guarantee
  • Unlimited revisions
  • Money-back guarantee
  • 24/7 support
Our Options
  • Writer’s samples
  • Expert Proofreading
  • Overnight delivery
  • Part-by-part delivery
  • Copies of used sources
Paper format
  • 275 words per page
  • 12 pt Arial/Times New Roman
  • Double line spacing
  • Any citation style (APA, MLA, Chicago/Turabian, Harvard)

AcademicWritingCompany guarantees

Our customer is the center of what we do and thus we offer 100% original essays..
By ordering our essays, you are guaranteed the best quality through our qualified experts.All your information and everything that you do on our website is kept completely confidential.

Money-back guarantee

Academicwritingcompany.com always strives to give you the best of its services. As a custom essay writing service, we are 100% sure of our services. That is why we ensure that our guarantee of money-back stands, always

Read more

Zero-plagiarism tolerance guarantee

The paper that you order at academicwritingcompany.com is 100% original. We ensure that regardless of the position you are, be it with urgent deadlines or hard essays, we give you a paper that is free of plagiarism. We even check our orders with the most advanced anti-plagiarism software in the industry.

Read more

Free-revision guarantee

The Academicwritingcompany.com thrives on excellence and thus we help ensure the Customer’s total satisfaction with the completed Order.To do so, we provide a Free Revision policy as a courtesy service. To receive free revision the Academic writing Company requires that the you provide the request within Fifteen (14) days since the completion date and within a period of thirty (30) days for dissertations and research papers.

Read more

Privacy and Security policy

With Academicwritingcompan.com, your privacy is the most important aspect. First, the academic writing company will never resell your personal information, which include credit cards, to any third party. Not even your lecturer on institution will know that you bought an essay from our academic writing company.

Read more

Adherence to requirements guarantee

The academic writing company writers know that following essay instructions is the most important part of academic writing. The expert writers will, therefore, work extra hard to ensure that they cooperate with all the requirements without fail. We also count on you to help us provide a better academic paper.

Read more

Calculate the price of your order

550 words
We'll send you the first draft for approval by September 11, 2020 at 10:52 AM
Total price:
$26
The price is based on these factors:
Customer Academic level
Number of pages required
Urgency of paper